Work Permits

The first step for each potential applicant is to establish whether they need an Italian work permit (permesso di soggiorno di lavoro) in the first instance.

In accordance with the principle of free movement of persons, goods, services and capital, EU (European Union) and EEA (European Economic Area) nationals can be employed in Italy without a work permit from the Italian authorities as per Article 45 of the Lisbon Treaty.

However, non-EU citizens will have to apply for a work permit in order to carry out employment in Italy and need to demonstrate that they are highly skilled workers and have a binding job offer. Non-EU citizens must have obtained a work visa from the Italian Consular authorities before coming to Italy. There are two ways in which to obtain a work permit in Italy: nulla osta al lavoro and decreto flussi.

Authorisation Request (Nulla osta al lavoro):

It will be your Italian employer who must first apply for your entry clearance into Italy for the purposes of employment, which is known as a nulla osta al lavoro. At their local Municipal Office (Comune) your Italian employer will apply for authorisation for you to enter Italy and work for their organisation. After and if authorisation has been granted, the Comune will then inform the Italian Consulate or Embassy in your home country if your application can go ahead. You will then be provided with an entry visa for the purposes of employment in Italy within 30 days.

Decree of the President of the Council of Ministers (Decreto Flussi):

 

Each country has an Immigration Quota Decree that is issued on a yearly basis in the Gazzetta Ufficiale and provides deadlines by which applications must be submitted and how many permits are available in that given year. This law establishes the maximum of non-EU seasonal workers who can enter each country. The Italian 2017 Quota Decree provided 30,850 permits (3,000 non-seasonal workers; 10,850 conversion of existing permits and 17,000 seasonal workers).

The documents that are required for any Italian work permit application are your passport, your residence contract (in Italian), proof that you will be able to fund your journey to the UK and evidence of your professional qualifications.

The European Blue Card (work permit that facilitates Migration of Educated Third Country Nationals to Europe to continue a career working in highly skilled jobs and a residence permit enabling family reunification) is extremely beneficial as it gives non-EU nationals the opportunity to work across 25 of the 28 EU Member States.

Nb. Countries who are not members of the Blue Card Scheme are: UK, Ireland and Denmark.